MICKEY ROONEY Was Abandoned Twice by his Family, Bounced Back to Larger than Life Figure (and his 5’4″ frame), Quotes

10 April 2014
Comments Off on MICKEY ROONEY Was Abandoned Twice by his Family, Bounced Back to Larger than Life Figure (and his 5’4″ frame), Quotes

Mickey Rooney with Judy Garland in an edited version of ‘Good Morning.’ 1939

 

 

A freelance interview from 2010 with Mickey Rooney traces his roots from a poor, orphaned boy in vaudeville.

 MICKEY ROONEY Was Abandoned Twice by his

Family, Bounced Back as Larger

than Life Figure (and his 5’4″ frame), Quotes

“When I was twenty I was the number one box office star in the world. When I turned forty nobody wanted me. I couldn’t find a job.”

— Mickey Rooney

Mickey Rooney
Seriously!

“A great man is only the reflection of a great boy in a larger mirror.”

— Ann Shoemaker, the actress playing his mother in Strike up the Band (1940), to actor Mickey Rooney

“Even in 1940, it was unlikely that movie audiences believed that Mickey Rooney, then twenty years old, would grow up to be a great man. He was, at the time, one of Hollywood’s biggest stars. One secret of his allure was that it seemed he would never grow up at all.”

— Thomas Hine, Mickey Rooney and the Downsizing of Man

 

 

MICKEY ROONEY, who we lost over the weekend, was not only one of the last of the early film stars but one of the sharpest, most interesting interviews until his last days. Here are some famous quotes from the  5’4″ 93-year-young child star turned adult star, who left a major mark…though probably under-appreciated, as per the later article.   He certainly had a full life and experience  to make these statements:


Always get married in the morning. That way if it doesn’t work out, you haven’t wasted the whole day
.
Mickey Rooney

(Editor’s Note: Rooney was married seven times so he could speak to this…of course, in fairness we should really have the wives’ take…)
You always pass failure on your way to success.
Mickey Rooney
I’m the only man in the world with a marriage licence made out to whom it may concern.

Mickey Rooney
A lot of people have asked me how short I am. Since my last divorce, I think I’m about $100,000 short.
Mickey Rooney

 
I buy women shoes and they use them to walk away from me.
Mickey Rooney
I was a thirteen-year-old boy for thirty years.
Mickey Rooney

 
When I say I do, the justice of the peace replies, ‘I know, I know…’
Mickey Rooney

Read more at http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/authors/m/mickey_rooney.html#uZQB3fls1MTwrI8Y.99

 

“When I was twenty I was the number one box office star in the world. When I turned forty nobody wanted me. I couldn’t find a job.”

— Mickey Rooney

This excerpt from Rooney’s moving acceptance speech upon finally receiving a full-sized honorary Oscar (he received a miniature statue as a juvenile) in 1983 referred to his paltry output in films over the previous twenty-five years. In his speech he mentions that it was the Broadway play Sugar Babies that resurrected his career, but that the payoff wasn’t more good film roles but rather a remarkable performance in a made-for-TV movie, Bill. Rooney’s success on Broadway and in Bill in effect shamed the Academy into this belated acknowledgment of his stunning talent.

  MICKEY ROONEY, Larger than Life (and his 5’4″), Quotes

by Jim MacEachern, 2013

Many people are puzzled by the high regard Rooney has attained late in his career. Writers Gore Vidal and Tennessee Williams were huge fans. Vidal spoke highly of Mickey in his book Screening History. Vidal appeared as a guest programmer on Turner Classic Movies to introduce the 1935 Max Reinhardt movie of A Midsummer Night’s Dream and said that Rooney’s performance as Puck changed his life by stimulating his love for Shakespeare. Bette Davis, Cary Grant, Anthony Quinn, and Laurence Olivier have also paid tribute to his gifts as a performer. Yet probably the last really good films Rooney was in prior to The Black Stallion in 1979 were Breakfast at Tiffany’s (1961) and Requiem for a Heavyweight (1962). And since his beautiful, Oscar-nominated performance in Stallion, there have been very few films of note. Much of the esteem Rooney has garnered in recent years is for his entire body of work, which has included some incredible work for the small screen, particularly his performances in some of the best dramatic programs during the so-called Golden Age of Television in the late ’50s and into the early ’60s. A few of his best-remembered roles are in The Comedian (1957) and “Last Night of a Jockey” (1963), and the highlight of his seemingly endless career came in the TV movie Bill in 1981.

“I was a 14-year-old boy for 30 years.”

— Mickey Rooney

One of the Mick’s very best performances was as Grady, the washed-up jockey in “Last Night of a Jockey” on Rod Serling’s Twilight Zone (1963). Rooney is the sole performer in this episode. The story concerns a jockey who has been suspended from racing for horse doping and race fixing. Early in the program, Grady looks at himself in the mirror with revulsion. He screams at his reflection with self-recrimination, calling himself a runt and a shrimp with a palpable self-hatred. Grady is alone in a rooming house with a bottle of booze close by. Suddenly Grady’s subconscious produces an apparition in the mirror who talks back to him. His alter ego takes over the recriminations with glee. Grady’s reflection taunts him with a list of the mistakes he has made in his life, and Grady responds defensively to the heckling. At first he tries to physically remove this voice by striking himself in the head. Rooney is working very close to his own subconscious here. He is, after all, playing a performer who is a has-been, banned from his work, and at times over the decades Rooney must have felt the same way about his own profession. It is chilling to watch this great actor literally bludgeoning himself with vicious words like runt and shrimp knowing all too well that his lack of physical stature hindered his own career greatly.
How aware was Rooney that this role was so close to his real-life predicament in so many ways? It’s hard to know. Even though he has written two autobiographies (the first in the early ’60s was ghost-written by sportswriter Roger Kahn), his version of the truth has always been somewhat unreliable. It’s not that he is deliberately lying but that he has such an emotional commitment to make-believe that he tends to see the world the way he would like it to be rather than the way it is. So the Mick is not very good at introspection. This is a major reason he is so bad on talk shows. In fact, he has never even appeared on Inside the Actors Studio with James Lipton. That show is now in its 18th season and literally hundreds of actors have appeared on it, but not Rooney. There have been some great actors interviewed, and also scores of mediocre ones, but many of them went to drama school and/or college and can therefore converse intelligently and often charmingly about their rather ordinary careers and their “craft” in a way that Rooney cannot. In his interview for the Archives of American Television, he is asked to speak about his work in Bill, but he finds it difficult. Beyond giving the outline of the story and saying that he played the role “to the best of my ability,” he is reluctant to talk about the issue of institutionalizing the mentally handicapped, just saying that “he was an impaired man. How do you talk about that?” It’s as if Mickey felt sorry for the real Bill Sachter and didn’t want to tarnish his memory (Bill died in 1983) by discussing him. He is a completely intuitive actor. I doubt that he does much analyzing of his work either before or after the performance. He just does it without thinking about it. And for him that approach has worked magnificently. Mickey’s education has been show business ever since he busted out of his basinet at 17 months and pranced out onto the stage in the middle of his parents’ vaudeville act. The only formal education he had was at the little school for child actors on the MGM lot.
'Last Night of a Jockey'
In “Last Night of a Jockey,” Grady’s alter ego torments him throughout the show’s first half, but then offers to grant him any wish. Grady ruminates on the possibilities and decides that he wants to be big. The sight of Rooney-Grady standing in the middle of the room, arms at his side, looking upward and with all his power shouting to the heavens “I want to be big” is truly moving. The second act opens with the sound of thunder and a flash of lightning as Grady wakes up. He wipes the sleep from his eyes and immediately senses something a little odd. He looks and sees his feet dangle over the end of the bed. He picks up the phone, and it disappears into his huge hand. He begins to giggle as he realizes this Swiftian turn to his life. He mumbles, “This is wild,” as he giggles with delight. He stands up and the room shrinks around him. He is big! The first thing he does is call up an old girlfriend who jilted him to let her know that he is a changed man. She rebuffs him again. She thinks he’s crazy when he tells her about his growth spurt — “I must be six, seven, eight feet tall. The Lakers will be scouting me soon.” She doesn’t buy it, and he hangs up in anger.
'Last Night of a Jockey'
This being The Twilight Zone, the payoff comes when Grady gets a call from a racing official telling him there was a meeting of racing officials, who agreed that he should be reinstated. Grady is of course ecstatic at the news, but as soon as he hangs up the phone he hears his alter-ego cackling madly. It slowly dawns on Grady that he is now too big to be a jockey. Grady’s alter ego torments him further: “Your dreams were really quite small. Now if you wished to win the Kentucky Derby cleanly, that would have been something.” Grady staggers around the room in angry disbelief. He begins to trash the room like Godzilla on a rampage. He collapses in a heap on the floor crying in anguish, “I’m too big … I’m too big …”
Mickey didn’t even receive an Emmy nomination for stripping himself psychologically naked as Grady. Many of his performances were underappreciated at the time. Just a few years prior to The Twilight Zone episode, he gave one of his greatest performances in the biopic Baby Face Nelson. Director Don Siegel used Rooney’s lack of stature throughout the story. In one scene Nelson has a meeting with some gangsters in a playground. Rooney is sitting on a swing below a sign saying “children over 12 not allowed on swings.” But this low-budget movie did almost no business when it was released, and Rooney received bad reviews. Newsweek‘s movie critic wrote, “This one offers pocket-size, Puckish Mickey Rooney in the unlikeliest role of his career — that of Public Enemy No.1, vintage 1933. It is as incongruous as Edward G. Robinson playing Pinocchio.” But this movie is now considered a classic of the genre. David Thomson in his Biographical Dictionary of Film writes that it is one of the greatest performances in screen history and that it “achieves a fearful poetry because of Rooney’s seizure of part of his own appalling destiny.”

“Special thanks to Mickey Rooney. He said, ‘Kid, when the time comes to deliver, I’ll deliver’ and he sure did.”

— Corey Blechman, acceptance speech on winning an Emmy for his script for Bill

Rooney’s work in Bill is a masterpiece of physical acting. He said in an interview that everyone was telling him how to play the part of a mentally challenged man, but “I told them to shut up”; he pounds his chest, “I’ll do it from here.” There is a scene early in the movie when Barry Morrow (Dennis Quaid), who is doing a documentary on the real-life story of Bill Sachter, a mentally handicapped man who was warehoused with schizophrenics and people with every manner of mental impairment for forty-six years, has foolishly taken him back to Granville to see how he would react. When Barry goes on a tour of the institution, he leaves Bill with one of the patients he remembers from his decades there. Bill soon misses Barry and wanders off to try and find him. Barry becomes concerned when he comes back and finds him missing. He eventually locates Bill hiding in a corner and comforts him. Bill is frightened out of his wits and rushes back to Barry’s car. On the drive home Bill is sure he sees his sister, Sara, walking down the street and forces Barry to stop the car. Bill gets out and approaches the woman, who runs away. Bill follows her, calling Sara … Sara. He finally catches up to her, and she tells him she is not Sara and that her name is Ida. The look on Rooney’s (Bill’s) face reminded me in its total anguish of Munch’s The Scream. People talk about the actor’s mask; nowhere has it been more compelling to me than in that scene.

“We’re all just grown up little children making believe.”

— Mickey Rooney

One of the most remarkable things about Mickey Rooney is how he has been able to maintain an almost childlike emotional connection to performing. Film critic David Thomson has called it an almost “psychic identification with fantasy.” Nowhere is this childlike sensibility more evident than in his performance as Bill Sachter. He plays the character as if he were a child with very adult problems. We see this quality in the way he moves, walks, sits, and talks. There is a scene of Bill sitting on the floor with Barry’s young son, Clay, playing with a toy. Bill’s posture is that of a kid, with short legs outstretched on the floor. He pulls the string on the talking toy and bends toward Clay so they can both hear the message.
Bill on His OwnBut Bill is not a child. He is an adult with severe limitations. When Barry and his wife have to move away to take another job, leaving Bill essentially where they found him, he is alone again. There is a scene with Bill on the phone trying to call Barry but getting confused by all the numbers. The operator tries to help him, but he keeps telling her different numbers. He is so pitiful trying to do a simple thing that we all take for granted. He has a pained look on his face as he struggles, and the operator finally tells him she can’t help him, and when he hangs up the phone his entire body sags with disappointment. He seems so much a child, but his pain is that of an adult failing at something he desperately wants to do — communicate with his friend. Bill walks with a limp because he has an ulcerated leg that was not taken care of at Granville. His gait is slow and then quickens, like a kid who doesn’t quite know what he wants to do and then all of a sudden remembers. He is hesitant when he speaks because as an adult he is self-conscious about his communication skills, but his words pour out quickly when he gets excited and feels secure with the person he is talking to. Rooney used all the skills he had acquired as an actor to, in essence, play a child. British director Anthony Page was at the helm of Bill. Page’s background had been largely in the theater, but here he directs Rooney to a marvelously restrained performance that does justice to the story. It should be noted that the real Barry Morrow went on to win an Oscar for co-writing the story for Rain Man. It has essentially the same theme as Bill (am I my brother’s keeper), and Dustin Hoffman won an Oscar for playing an autistic man. Rooney deservedly won an Emmy and Golden Globe for this, the greatest performance of his career. He went on to receive another Emmy nomination for the sequel, Bill on His Own.
The Mick has continued to work steadily since, which is a far cry from the period when he couldn’t find employment at all. Things at one time were so bad that he would actually take jobs appearing at parties for cash. Robert Osborne, one of the hosts of Turner Classic Movies, has interviewed Rooney for his show Private Screenings and has mentioned that he is surprised that Mickey has not received an AFI Lifetime Achievement Award or even a Kennedy Center Honor. Those awards have gone to actors whose careers and personal lives have not been so messy. As great as Rooney has been when working with good material, he has probably also been in more bad movies than any other major actor. Films like How to Stuff a Wild Bikini, The Private Lives of Adam and Eve, and countless other bottom-billed drive-in movies don’t help when reviewing his body of work. He has been married eight times, and the boyfriend who did not like it when Rooney’s wife decided to go back to her husband murdered Rooney’s fifth wife. The killer of Barbara Rooney was a Yugoslav actor named Milos Milosevic, who then shot himself after the deed. This, of course, devastated Rooney but didn’t kill his insatiable desire to perform. A big part of the reason Mickey did so many bad movies was because he was in desperate financial straits. He had lots of alimony to pay over the decades, a gambling problem, and got involved in all kinds of crazy business ventures that included a mail-order Self-Study Acting Course and a food line headed by Mickey Rooney Macaroni. None of these business ventures panned out.
Mickey Rooney was awarded the Telluride Medal in 2005. Telluride is known as the American Cannes and to say that choosing Mickey Rooney for this prestigious award raised a few eyebrows is an understatement. Roger Ebert interviewed him for the tribute. The clips package that was shown included, of course, his work as a young man at MGM, the musicals with Judy, Andy Hardy films, and a few of his later dramatic roles. Telluride makes a specialty out of surprising its audiences with unexpected treasures, and in connection with Rooney’s tribute, the festival showed The Comedian, a 1957 live-on-TV Playhouse 90 drama written by Rod Serling and directed by John Frankenheimer (who called Rooney “the best actor I’ve ever worked with”). The video, recently released on DVD, is a revelation for anyone who identifies Rooney with Andy Hardy. The Comedian was rebroadcast in 1981 as part of an anthology series on PBS called The Golden Age of Television. An added bonus to the program were interviews with director Frankenheimer and surviving cast members Rooney, Kim Hunter, and Mel Torme.
The Comedian
The Comedian is a scathing portrait of the behind-the-scenes turmoil of putting on a weekly live comedy/variety series. Rooney plays Sammy Hogarth, the star of the show who browbeats everyone around him into submission. His favorite target is his weakling brother Lester (Mel Torme), whom he keeps around as a gofer and to be the butt of jokes in his weekly monologue. Lester has grown tired of the abuse — or rather his wife (Kim Hunter) has — and she has threatened to leave him if he doesn’t stand up for himself. Edmond O’Brien plays the dried-up head writer who in desperation uses the work of a dead colleague to infuse life into the show that by midweek was going nowhere. Lester finds out about the plagiarism and threatens to take this information to a columnist who is out to get Sammy unless the jokes at Lester’s expense are dropped from the monologue. The acting is superb from the entire cast, but it is Rooney who steals the show. His Sammy Hogarth is a despicable human being, but a recognizable one.

 

MORE

Mickey Rooney in BILL, 1981 – perhaps Rooney’s crowning achievement and a glimpse into his own troubled life.

 MICKEY ROONEY Was Abandoned Twice by his

Family, Bounced Back to Larger

than Life Figure (and his 5’4″ frame), Quotes

IT’S NEVER TOO LATE – Granny on Road To Success – Celebrating 100 Years

25 February 2014
Comments Off on IT’S NEVER TOO LATE – Granny on Road To Success – Celebrating 100 Years

Grandma on harley 800 for tshirt w logo

 IT’S NEVER TOO LATE – Granny on Road To

Success – Celebrating 100 Years

What better depicts our famous Road To Success poster than Granny, celebrating 100 along with the ROAD (circa 1913)  –   true inspirations to all.  Tshirts, Posters and more and http://posterpalooza.info/?p=1767    CHECK CODE FOR SALE PRICING   NEVER TOO LATE TSHIRT

 IT’S NEVER TOO LATE – Granny on Road To Success – Celebrating 100 Years

 

 NOW CELEBRATING 100 YEARS! – The ROAD TO SUCCESS!road to scuccess 1-10 large scan max quality

 

 Famous ROAD TO SUCCESS Motivational Poster  and Tshirt

circa 1913 – NOW CELEBRATING 100 YEARS!

framed
print $19
road to success tshirt $19

 IT’S NEVER TOO LATE – Granny on Road To Success – Celebrating 100 Years

Pick One:

 

If YOU LIKE THIS Please Like and Share:

EYEWEAR Holiday Sale – Eyeglasses, Sunglasses, Prescription Lenses – FREE Medical ID Bracelet

13 December 2013
Comments Off on EYEWEAR Holiday Sale – Eyeglasses, Sunglasses, Prescription Lenses – FREE Medical ID Bracelet


 

 

EYEWEAR Holiday Sale –

Eyeglasses, Sunglasses,

Prescription Lenses –

FREE Medical ID Bracelet

Win a FREE Life Saving  Medical ID Bracelet

 

FRAMESDIRECT   Save $15 on Eyeglasses, Sunglasses, and Prescription Sunglasses priced $150-$249! Enter Code: HOLIDAY15AF at AFEyewear.com. Offer ends 12/18

 

 

96-year old Songwriter’s Perfect Antidote to Miley Cyrus

21 October 2013
Comments Off on 96-year old Songwriter’s Perfect Antidote to Miley Cyrus

This weekend I had songwriter Fred Stobaugh on my show. You may remember, that when Miley Cyrus was taking a lot of flak from her raunchy performance at the MTV Video Awards, I mentioned Fred Stobaugh was the perfect counter to the performers out there who think they need to gyrate, strip down and curse to get a hit song.

Last April, Fred lost his wife of 73 years, Lorraine. Fred says she was the prettiest girl he ever saw, and he fell in love at first sight. After her death, he was sitting alone when he started humming a simple tune about her and wrote it down. He called it “Oh Sweet Lorraine.” He entered it in a songwriting contest. The sponsor, Green Shoe Studio, couldn’t accept a handwritten song, but they were so moved, they produced the song, with a video telling the story behind it. Well, the video went viral. And at the time, among all the sex-drenched tunes by Lady Gaga and Robin Thicke, you found “Oh Sweet Lorraine,” 96-year-old Fred Stobaugh’s song of undying love for his late wife, perched at #9 on iTunes’ top 10 chart. A great reminder that all a song really needs to be popular is for it to touch our hearts.

To watch a video about Fred and his story please click the link below. We’ve posted it on my website and hope you enjoy it.

http://www.mikehuckabee.com/index.cfm?p=featured-video


View more gifts at Zazzle.

Celebrating 100 Years of success – our famous, original, 30 year old prints- 1913 Road to Success motivational posters  $29 (reg. $39) make Great Gift/ promo!

Also unframed and tshirts $19

96-year old Songwriter’s Perfect Antidote to Miley Cyrus

Biographies,Biography Books,Autobiographies,Best Economics Books – ‘Crisis and Compassion’ – Economics Professor’s Rags to Riches Life

19 October 2013
Comments Off on Biographies,Biography Books,Autobiographies,Best Economics Books – ‘Crisis and Compassion’ – Economics Professor’s Rags to Riches Life

LETICHE BOOK COVERCrises and Compassion: From Russia to the Golden Gate (Footprints Series)

 

John M. Letiche started life as Ianik Letichevsky, a citizen of the newly constituted Union of Soviet Socialist Republics. The son of a brilliant but dictatorial father and a loving, cultivated mother, he went on to a remarkable career as an accomplished scholar, professor of economics, and adviser to governments. Letiche, now in his nineties, provides an intriguing look at the changes that have occurred during his lifetime. Following his Kiev childhood and formative years in Depression-era Montreal, he completed a doctorate at the University of Chicago and took up a Rockefeller fellowship at the Council on Foreign Relations in New York City. As a technical advisor to the Economic Commission for Africa he conducted trade talks with both gifted and corrupt heads of state in sub-Saharan Africa, and later shared a working White House dinner with an infamous American president. His half-century-long teaching career at Berkeley included a front row seat for the Free Speech Movement and the most documented student revolt in popular history. Told with humour, insight, and humility, Crises and Compassion moves nimbly among weighty events and meaningful personal history, showing how “civility in intellectual exchange” came to be the guiding principle of a life of monumental experiences (Amazon)

 

 

Memoir Traces Economics

Professors’ Climb from

Anti-Semitic Russia to Advisor

of World Leaders

 

Crisis & Compassion – From Russia to the Golden Gate

5.0 out of 5 stars Comment by Jeremy Kinsman, February 11, 2011

“Dr. Jack Letiche’s twentieth century journey instructs, entertains, and inspires the reader who will finish the book better off on any account, but above all for the time spent with the life and mind of a great thinker and global citizen.”

Jeremy Kinsman, Canadian Ambassador or High Commissioner in Moscow, Rome, London, and Brussels, and Regents’ Lecturer 2009-10, University of California, Berkeley
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No
Report abuse | Permalink
Comment Comment

5.0 out of 5 stars More than Economics – Professor’s Memoir A Real Life Rags to Riches Adventure, March 19, 2011
By Burt Kaufman

What a read! What a Life – and it seems a long way from over for renown Berkeley Economics Professor John Letiche! Now in his early 90s, Letiche has written his fourteenth book, his fascinating memoir recounting an almost unbelievable journey from a childhood in Russia, rife with anti-semitism, to adviser to world leaders. The book reads almost like an adventure story in its real life drama, including a serendipitous marriage proposal, an eye-opening meeting with President Nixon and, later, historic conferences with the Council on Foreign Relations.
One might expect a book written by an economics professor to be very technical but this book, written sans ghostwriter, is easily readable for all ages and education levels. Letiche has a very colorful, yet concise writing style.
This is less a tome on economics than a real life story one must read to appreciate. It might even affect your own life.

Crisis & Compassion – From Russia to the Golden Gate

From Anti-semitic Russia to the Golden Gate and more motiviational stories  ,

 

 

 

 

 

 

autographed books,signed books,
buy book online,signed books by,buy books,events in nyc,
hard to find books,find a book,book websites,book stores,
signing in book,books signing,book signing,book signing dates,
book signings,berkeley book sotre,berkeley bookstores

From Anti-Semitic Russia to World Advisor

Senior Citizen Discounts – List of Restaurants,Travel – City Deals, Ecoupons, Military Discounts

2 June 2013
Comments Off on Senior Citizen Discounts – List of Restaurants,Travel – City Deals, Ecoupons, Military Discounts

Dunkin Donuts, alone , could save you over $365 if you wen there everyday for your FREE Cup of Coffee! (Seniors Only)

 Did you know that all the below places offer senior discounts?

And, you don’t even need a coupon for them!

Senior Citizen Discounts –  Restaurants –

City Deals, Ecoupons, Military Discounts

Restaurants

Applebee’s: 15% off with Golden Apple Card (60+)

Arby’s: 10% off (55+)

Ben & Jerry’s: 10% off (60+)

Bennigan’s: discount varies by location

Bob’s Big Boy: discount varies by location (60+)

Boston Market: 10% off (65+)

Burger King: 10% off (60+)

Captain D’s Seafood: discount varies on location (62+)

Chick-Fil-A: 10% off or free small drink or coffee (55+)

Chili’s: 10% off (55+)

CiCi’s Pizza: 10% off (60+)

Culver’s: 10% off (60+)

Denny’s: 10% off, 20% off for AARP members (55+)

Dunkin’ Donuts: 10% off or free coffee (55+)

Einstein’s Bagels: 10% off baker’s dozen of bagels (60+)

Fuddrucker’s: 10% off any senior platter (55+)

Gatti’s Pizza: 10% off (60+)

Golden Corral: 10% off (60+)

Hardee’s: $0.33 beverages everyday (65+)

IHOP: 10% off (55+)

Jack in the Box: up to 20% off (55+)

KFC: free small drink with any meal (55+)

Krispy Kreme: 10% off (50+)

Long John Silver’s: various discounts at participating locations (55+)

McDonald’s: discounts on coffee everyday (55+)

Mrs. Fields: 10% off at participating locations (60+)

Shoney’s: 10% off

Sonic: 10% off or free beverage (60+)

Steak ‘n Shake: 10% off every Monday & Tuesday (50+)

Subway: 10% off (60+)

Sweet Tomatoes: 10% off (62+)

Taco Bell: 5% off; free beverages for seniors (65+)

TCBY: 10% off (55+)

Tea Room Cafe: 10% off (50+)

Village Inn: 10% off (60+)

Waffle House: 10% off every Monday (60+)

Wendy’s: 10% off (55+)

White Castle: 10% off (62+)

Retail And Apparel

Banana Republic: 10% off (50+)

Bealls: 20% off first Tuesday of each month (50+)

Belk’s: 15% off first Tuesday of every month (55+)

Big Lots: 10% off

Bon-Ton Department Stores: 15% off on senior discount days (55+)

C.J. Banks: 10% off every Wednesday (60+)

Clarks: 10% off (62+)

Dress Barn: 10% off (55+)

Goodwill: 10% off one day a week (date varies by location)

Hallmark: 10% off one day a week (date varies by location)

Kmart: 20% off (50+)

Kohl’s: 15% off (60+)

Modell’s Sporting Goods: 10% off

Rite Aid: 10% off on Tuesdays & 10% off prescriptions

Ross Stores: 10% off every Tuesday (55+)

The Salvation Army Thrift Stores: up to 50% off (55+)

Stein Mart: 20% off red dot/clearance items first Monday of every month (55+)

Grocery
Albertson’s: 10% off first Wednesday of each month (55+)

American Discount Stores: 10% off every Monday (50+)

Compare Foods Supermarket: 10% off every Wednesday (60+)

DeCicco Family Markets: 5% off every Wednesday (60+)

Food Lion: 6% off every Monday (60+)

Fry’s Supermarket: free Fry’s VIP Club Membership & 10% off every Monday (55+)

Great Valu Food Store: 5% off every Tuesday (60+)

Gristedes Supermarket: 10% off every Tuesday (60+)

Harris Teeter: 5% off every Tuesday (60+)

Hy-Vee: 5% off one day a week (date varies by location)

Kroger: 10% off (date varies by location)

Morton Williams Supermarket: 5% off every Tuesday (60+)

The Plant Shed: 10% off every Tuesday (50+)

Publix: 5% off every Wednesday (55+)

Rogers Market place: 5% off every Thursday (60+)

Uncle Guiseppe’s Market place: 5% off (62+)

Travelhttp://www.TravelCountry.us – Everything Travel -Deals on Air, Hotel, Car Rentals, etctal Cars: 10% off; up to 20% off for AARP members (50+)

Cambria Suites: 20%-30% off (60+)

Clarion: 20%-30% off (60+)

Comfort Inn: 20%-30% off (60+)

Comfort Suites: 20%-30% off (60+)

Continental Airlines: no initiation fee for Continental Presidents Club & special fares for select destinations

Dollar Rent-A-Car: 10% off (50+)

Econo Lodge: 20%-30% off (60+)

Enterprise Rent-A-Car: 5% off for AARP members

Greyhound: 5% off (62+)

Hampton Inns & Suites: 10% off when booked 72 hours in advance

Hertz: up to 25% off for AARP members

Holiday Inn: 10%-30% off depending on location (62+)

Hyatt Hotels: 25%-50% off (62+)

InterContinental Hotels Group: various discounts at all hotels (65+)

Mainstay Suites: 10% off with Mature Traveler’s Discount (50+); 20%-30% off (60+)

Marriott Hotels: 15% off (62+)

Motel 6: 10% off (60+)

Myrtle Beach Resort: 10% off (55+)

National Rent-A-Car: up to 30% off for AARP members

Quality Inn: 20%-30% off (60+)

Rodeway Inn: 20%-30% off (60+)

Sleep Inn: 20%-30% off (60+)

Southwest Airlines: various discounts for ages 65 and up (call before booking for discount)

Trailways Transportation System: various discounts for ages 50 and up

United Airlines: various discounts for ages 65 and up (call before booking for discount)

U.S. Airways: various discounts for ages 65 and up (call before booking for discount)

Activities And Entertainment

AMC Theaters: up to 30% off (55+)

Bally Total Fitness: up to $100 off memberships (62+)

Busch Gardens Tampa: $3 off one-day tickets (50+)

Carmike Cinemas: 35% off (65+)

Cinemark/Century Theaters: up to 35% off

U.S. National Parks: $10 lifetime pass; 50% off additional services including camping (62+)

Regal Cinemas: 30% off

Ripley’s Believe it or Not: @ off one-day ticket (55+)

SeaWorld Orlando: $3 off one-day tickets (50+)

Cell Phone Discounts
AT&T: Special Senior Nation 200 Plan $29.99/month (65+)

Jitterbug: $10/month cell phone service (50+)

Verizon Wireless: Verizon Nationwide 65 Plus Plan $29.99/month (65+).

Miscellaneous

Great Clips: $3 off hair cuts (60+)

Super Cuts: $2 off haircuts (60+)

I have already been told that A&P supermarkets offers 5% off to people over 55 every Tuesday. If you know of any other senior deals that aren’t on the list, please add them.

OTHER RESOURSES

http://www.HealthFitness.ws – Health Lifestyle Info / Discounts on Nutriton and Exercise

Walgreen’s

http://www.InsuranceHealth.cc – Affordable Health Insurance for  Everyone

http://www.TravelCountry.us – Everything Travel -Deals on Air, Hotel, Car Rentals, etc

Senior Citizen Discounts –  Restaurants – City Deals, Ecoupons, Military Discounts

 

 


GET THE LATEST, TOP DEALS EASILY, IN ONE PLACE:
APPS PROMO coupon

GET THE LATEST DEALS AS THEY HAPPEN,DELIVERED AUTOMATICALLY,
RIGHT TO YOUR CELL:
cOUPONS.JGP SIGN






 21 FREE GIFTS        just for subscribing  !                    No Cost  or Obligation                                

We respect your email privacy

<!– /AWeber Web Form Generator 3.0

KABL, KYA Radio Live – San Franciso’s Classic Radio

29 April 2013
Comments Off on KABL, KYA Radio Live – San Franciso’s Classic Radio



Legendary KABL Radio Lives On Starring Legendary Bill Moen

http://KABL960.com     https://www.facebook.com/KABL960



        It’s nice to see some of my past is still around. Was pleased to see Bill Moen’s letter to the editor in San Franicsco Chronicle     the other day….  Moen was the lead broadcaster / DJ / Announcer on San Francisco-Oakland’s KABL ‘MOR” (middle of road) radio during the ‘Golden Era’ fifties and sixties right on up not that many years ago when the station was, unceremoniously sold / changed – and never replaced (How could it be)… So, what did Moen do but put his new digital  technical skills to work and keep the station on the air at KABL960.com. Give a listen! You’ll be glad you did…
Funny , growing up as a kid I didn’t appriciate this kind of music as I do now..  Great variety, frombig band to 50s crooners to even some of the better later music – and lots of Moen humor and trivia thrown in…. Didn’t realize KABL was broadcast out of the legendary Cliff House Restaurant 

at Land’s End, overlooking the beautiful Pacific Ocean (next to the old Sutro Bath House!  )
We’ll be doing some more features on KABL and Bill, I’m sure, in the future… San Francisco – Oakland had so many great stations during THE ERA… KSFO, KEWB, KYA, KDIA, KOBY along with KABL with legendary DJs or broadcasters like Don Sherwood, Russ The Moose Syracuse, Al Jazzbeau Collins, Bobby Dale, Gene Nelson, Tommy Saunders, Tom Donahue -and many more.. Plus, even legendary Gary Owens and Kasey Kasem (who celebrated a birthday last week) came through town (KEWB) to work a spell.well as other Radio.. KYA , we’re happy to say, still LIVES much like Moen’s KABL. You can listen to it here thanks to long timeKYA DJ Gary Mora .  Gary’s got some nice

airchecks linked from the San Francisco Radio Museum so you can listen to your favorites again …


Russ The Moose Syracuse (1968)
Gene Nelson - KYA (c. 1965) Johnny Holliday (1966)
Russ “The Moose” Syracuse
Emperor Gene Nelson
Johnny Holliday
The legendary 1260 KYA was the radio home of many of the most talented announcers in the history of the industry. Bay Area listeners were entertained over the years by stars such as Emperor Gene NelsonJohnny HollidayTommy SaundersRuss “The Moose” Syracuse“Big Daddy” Tom Donahue,Jim StaggChris EdwardsTony BiggPeter TrippGary SchaeferBwana JohnnyNorman DavisBob MitchellCasey KasemEd HiderMike Cleary and Bill Holley, and legendary newsmen like Tony TremayneLarry BrownellBrad Messer and John FerrissLearn more about these and other illustrious KYA alumni!
Chris Edwards (1970) Mike Cleary - KYA Oneders KYA's Tom Campbell (1969)
Chris Edwards
Mike Cleary
Tom Campbell
 

KABL, KYA Radio Live – San Franciso’s Classic Radio

 

Dr. Seuss For Older Kids

16 April 2013
Comments Off on Dr. Seuss For Older Kids

DR SUESS

 

Just in case you weren’t feeling too old today………

The people who are starting college this fall were born in 1993.

They are too young to remember the space shuttle blowing up.

Their lifetime has always included AIDS.

The CD was introduced two years before they were born.

They have always had an answering machine.

They have always had cable. Jay Leno has always been on the Tonight Show.

Popcorn has always been microwaved…

They never took a swim and thought about Jaws.

They don’t know who Mork was or where he was from.

They never heard: ‘Where’s the Beef?’, ‘I’d walk a mile for a Camel ‘ or ‘de plane Boss, de plane’.

McDonald’s never came in Styrofoam containers.

They don’t have a clue how to use a typewriter.

Pass this on to the other old fogies on your list. Notice the larger type? That’s for those of us who have trouble reading. P.S. Save the earth.It’s the only planet with chocolate.

CARBONITE

Protect your files with Carbonite Online Backup

24 hour fitness 7 day pass

7 Day Free Pass

 

 

ANNETTE – Favorite Mouseketeer, Singer and Actress Will be Missed

16 April 2013
Comments Off on ANNETTE – Favorite Mouseketeer, Singer and Actress Will be Missed

annette collage    ONCE BIGGER THAN LIFE, ANOTHER GOOD DIES YOUNG…  

annette today

You have no doubt learned of the passing of Annette – only the first name is necessary – the 1950s /early 60s icon, who personified the era as much as anyone.  She gave a lot of good times to those lucky to have grown up in the day – the movies, the music, the memories – yet suffered  the past twenty-plus years with MS.  In fact, we posted a little tribute just weeks ago(below) , after learning about her and her husband’s efforts to gain more funding for not only her plight but Multiple Schlerosis sufferers, in general… Will follow up with some more classic videos and fun memories that will come alive again for many of you, we’re sure. More @ http://oldiescountry.blogspot.com/2013/04/annette-once-bigger-than-life-another.html


-pictured above Annette in 1990 (left) and  recent-

 

 

 

 

  from late March post:

  It was with great pleasure to finally catch up with Annette and her husband ,Glen Holt, who has stood by her for 30 years; they go public with their current life and continuing effort to find a cure for MS  via their  website,  AnnetteConnection.com.  Annette no longer can walk or even speak, though she still gets out and one can maybe  even see a twinkle in her eye.  It may be hard for some to watch this video though we find it an inspiration. There are also nice tributes from Shelley Fabares and others.   In this four part video series from CTV, we see Annette in her early years and today and  the efforts Glen and doctors have gone to in helping Annette deal with MS, including a new treatment that  is showing promise.  Glen is using Annette’s old foundation to continue researching help for annette and others with MS. He is hoping that, though Annette’s fans, he can raise money to still find a cure.  

 

annette collage

 

 

 

   *************************************************************

Annette had a run of 5 Top 20 hits  in the two year period, 1959-1960,  and then became quite a movie star, with at least six fun ‘beach’ movies between 1963-1965 with some more great music and followed up with a popular ‘reunion’ movie, ‘Back To The Beach’ with favorite Frankie Avalon and the gang, in 1987, shortly before being diagnosed with MS…

 **************************************************************

 

 

Congrats to Annette’s second husband, Glen .  for ‘lifting the curtain’ of MS, so as to   help others and being such a great inspiration to Annette, who has always been a great inspiration to so many of us form her days on the Mickey Mouse Club to her positive, fun movies ,music and lifestyle.

 

 

  So, again, we applaud Annette, Glen and their team. May we continue to hear inspirational news and  stories from them for many years to come  as we make contributions to the MS cause. Please  help spread your good cheer via their website, above and your own connections as we will do through http://www.OldiesCountry.com and http://www.SeniorCountry.org 

 

 

  I saw Annette with Frankie Avalon  about 20 years ago at Pleasanton, CA –  Alameda county fair,  just before she stopped performing. It was a great show and we would have hardly  known she was already dealing with early stage Multiple Sclerosis  We think it is great that Annette has  came out with her updated story with video now, with the help and encouragement of Glen.   We think it’s a beautful story. I’ve just spent the last three years with my 97 year old Dad , who just passed , but only after , again, three good last years, with kind people’s help and good cheer around him. People can still have quality of life, though sometimes it’s a challenge,even in these situations.

 

 

Rare, Indepth interview -ATTITUDES with Virginia Graham from late 80s- Annette reflects on the changing times and how she still lives up to her ‘clean, happy days’ image, which she relishes… 

 

 

 

 

Join us for more in Oldies Country

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Maybe the best for last… Trailer for ‘Beach Blanket Bingo’ 1965 featuring no less co-stars than Don Rickles, Paul Lynde and Buster Keaton, among other star names!!! 

 

 

From a fan… “She was beautiful, good-natured, humble and kind to everyone around her. And she did it all – TV, movies and music, one of the biggest stars in the world in her time. Then walked away from all of it to raise a family. A role model for everyone who works in this industry. Her suffering was cruel and undeserved, but she handled it courageously. Now she can RIP.”



Annette’s Music and Videos LIVE ON — Get Yours Here…. 




Annette

 


GET REGULAR OLDIES UPDATES and SPECIAL OFFERS 

 

 21 FREE GIFTS        just for subscribing  !                    No Cost  or Obligation                               

We respect your email privacy

–>

BOB HOPE Thanks for the Memories!

1 March 2013
Comments Off on BOB HOPE Thanks for the Memories!
BOB HOPE IN HEAVEN

For those of you too young to remember Bob Hope, ask your Grandparents.

And thanks for the memories 



I HOPE THIS WILL PUT A SMILE ON YOUR FACE AND IN YOUR HEART.
Tribute to a man who DID make a difference.





ON TURNING 70

‘I still chase women, but only
downhill’.


ON TURNING 80

‘That’s the time of your life when even your birthday suit needs pressing.’


ON TURNING 90

‘You know you’re getting old when the candles cost more than the cake.’


ON TURNING 100

‘I don’t feel old. In fact
, I don’t feel
anything until noon. Then it’s time for my nap.’


ON GIVING UP HIS EARLY CAREER, BOXING

‘I ruined my hands in the ring. The referee kept stepping on them.’


ON NEVER WINNING AN OSCAR

‘Welcome to the Academy Awards or, as it’s called at my home, ‘Passover’. 


ON GOLF

‘Golf is my profession. Show business is just to pay the green fees.’


ON PRESIDENTS

‘I have performed for 12 presidents and entertained only six.’


ON WHY HE CHOSE SHOWBIZ FOR HIS
CAREER
‘When I was born, the doctor said to my mother,

Congratulations, you have an eight pound ham.

ON RECEIVING THE CONGRESSIONAL GOLD MEDAL

‘I feel very humble, but I think I have the strength of character to fight it.’


ON HIS FAMILY’S EARLY POVERTY

‘Four of us slept in the one bed. When it got cold, mother threw on another brother.’


ON HIS SIX BROTHERS

‘That’s how I learned to dance. Waiting for the bathroom.’


ON HIS EARLY FAILURES

‘I would not have had anything to eat if it wasn’t for the
stuff the audience threw at me.’


ON GOING TO HEAVEN

‘I’ve done benefits for ALL religions. I’d hate to blow the hereafter on a technicality.’


Give me a sense of humor;

Lord, give me the grace to see a joke,
to get some humor out of life,
and to the person receiving this
the grace to pass it on to others.

« Previous PageNext Page »